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Housing

Grant Offered to Help Struggling Homeowners

LAS VEGAS -- Drive down any residential block in Las Vegas and you will probably find a foreclosed home. Many of those former homeowners say they didn't know where to get help or who to trust.

The good news is that the Nevada Supreme Court has awarded $300,000 in grants for five projects aimed at educating homeowners on how to save that roof over their heads.

Sixty-five-year-old Grace Fields is on the verge of losing her home. She has spent thousands of dollars in legal fees and advice. "The process has to be streamlined so that everyone can avail themselves of the information and the help," she said.

Barbara Buckley, executive director of Legal Aid of Nevada, says too many homeowners don't know where to seek help or get advice when their home is up for foreclosure. That's why she supports a $300,000 grant from the state, aimed at giving free education classes and legal advice.

More Businesses Moving to Downtown Las Vegas

LAS VEGAS -- The economy is tough, but some businesses are bucking the trend by expanding and relocating. And Downtown Las Vegas is getting a lot of attention.

After more than a year of searching for the perfect spot for her business, Michelle Dimauro, with Habit Design Studio, says she found it.

"Ever since we opened our business, we wanted to be in the Arts District," she said.

She isn't alone. Las Vegas Mayor Oscar Goodman says now more than ever, businesses are showing interest in relocating and even expanding to the downtown corridor, including the Arts District. Mayor Goodman says the city has pulled out all the stops in an effort to attract businesses to the area.

"All we can do is make it business friendly. We've waived all of the liquor license fees for these small taverns. We're changing our zoning requirements -- not making it as difficult," he said.

More Homeowners Falling Delinquent on Mortgages

LAS VEGAS -- The number of Southern Nevada homeowners delinquent on their mortgage payments has climbed steadily for the past several months. In some cases, it's people just willing to walk away from their homes, and in other cases, homeowners are holding out hope that they will get a loan modification.

In any given neighborhood, chances are good that a homeowner is the process of walking away from their mortgage. In the past, five months was typically the longest a homeowner could stay in their home until the bank would come knocking. But that is no longer the case.

Nick Nolf with The Nolf Group has been in the real estate business through the boom, the bust, and now the slow turn-around.

Residents Wonder When Redevelopment will Begin

LAS VEGAS -- In the heart of West Las Vegas lies F Street and Jefferson. There's the Town Tavern Casino and a street filled with dozens of churches.

But some residents believe F Street is a symbol of how the city has passed them by.

When F Street was cut off from much of Downtown Las Vegas because of the I-15 widening project, it created a perception for some residents that they were being cut off from the rest of the city.

Ward 5 Chamber of Commerce President Katherine Duncan points out the freeway wall she says also became an unfortunate symptom of redevelopment gone wrong.

"It could have been a beautiful park atmosphere, instead, it's left just dirt. I don't believe that any other neighborhood you would find a freeway wall being built this close to residential properties without some consideration for landscape. To me, that's an atrocity," she said.