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Truancy Court Judges Get Ready for Another Year | Education & Schools

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Truancy Court Judges Get Ready for Another Year
Truancy Court Judges Get Ready for Another Year

 

Clark County School District students who cut class will be facing a new batch of judges in the Truancy Diversion Project, otherwise known as truancy court.

Volunteer attorneys commit to be judges in the court and conduct weekly sessions with kids who are chronically truant. The volunteers received instructions about what to expect this year during orientation at Family Court Monday. Truancy court judges say there are a multitude of reasons students are skipping classes.

"It is a lack of friends. It is because they are hanging out with the wrong friends. It is because they do not feel good about the education they are getting. It is because they do not understand. They have learning problems. It is because they are watching other siblings. It is because they are homeless," truancy court judge William Potter said. 

According to one judge, the excuse he gets most often from students is that they go to bed too late to get up for school the next day.

Truancy courts are held at 38 schools around the district, mostly in middle schools. There are some high schools and one elementary school.  The goal of the program is to cut down on absenteeism and dropout rates, and ultimately cut down on the number of kids who end up in the juvenile justice system.

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