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I-Team: Settlement reached in CCSD case involving a special needs child |

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I-Team: Settlement reached in CCSD case involving a special needs child

LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — The I-Team investigated the case of a valley mother who pursued a fight against the Clark County School District (CCSD). This mother now wants to help other parents with their struggles.

The I-Team has investigated the process some parents have to go through to get answers from the Clark County School District. Often times, parents need to hire attorneys to get the answers and results they need or want, especially if their children have special needs and one local mother took this on herself.

According to Diana Battista, her son Graysen was having a tough time at Frias Elementary School, the 7-year-old has autism and while he can speak, expressing his thoughts can be a challenge.

“He was coming home with injuries and black and blue marks and things that the school staff said they couldn’t explain and I didn’t know where they were coming from,” Battista said.

Battista told the I-Team that the final straw when Graysen came home with a large red bump on his forehead.

Staff at Frias ES told him that Graysen fell on the playground and she pressed the District for answers about multiple incidents and pushed for school records.

When Diana received them, she found some allegations that Graysen was the aggressor in these incidents.

“I had no idea that there were all of these allegations all over my son’s files and in complete shock because it was the complete opposite of everything I was being told,” Battista told the I-Team.

She complained to the Nevada Department of Education, and requested a due process hearing. “I had enough support from the right people that they said you can do this,” said Battista.

Battista learned laws and went to Google to learn about Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) laws and prepared for months.

“There were many days that, I don’t wanna cry, many days that I had wanting to give up and my son meant more to me than giving up,” Battista said. “I refused to give up no matter how tired I was.”

Finally, she received a settlement agreement on Sept. 9. It states that CCSD agreed to provide special services for Graysen and. for school staff to meet with his parents regularly. Additionally, the settlement agreed to expunge records; three from incidents where Graysen is listed as the problem.

For the Battista family, Diana said the settlement was a big deal.

“For me to get all of that in the settlement, was huge for us and it just made it worth it, I was in complete shock and I couldn’t believe it,” she said.

The I-Team reached out to CCSD about Battista’s settlement, but a spokesperson said the District does not comment on individual student matters. Graysen no longer attends Frias Elementary and is now at Stuckey Elementary School, where Diana says he is doing well.

Diana is now looking to help other parents get results from CCSD for their children with special needs.

“It’s been a blessing in disguise,” said Battista.

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